In the News

''Scarce pandemic vaccine to be given in order''


"In the early weeks of a flu pandemic, the first to receive scarce supplies of vaccine will include the military, medical and emergency workers, pregnant women and babies — nearly 23 million people — under a draft federal plan to be outlined Tuesday in Washington.

At the back of the pack, in a pandemic of the sort that killed 500,000 Americans in 1918, would be 74 million sick and elderly adults and 122 million healthy people ages 19-64.

The plan was developed by a government working group that met with scientists and business and community representatives over several months. It provides guidelines for pandemic planners and offers a glimpse into some agonizing decisions that could be necessary in the context of a swift-moving infectious disease and a shortage of protective vaccine."

Full Article 
Date added:
Oct 22, 2007

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