Media Coverage

''Southeast paying health price for high antibiotic use''


"Antibiotic use in the United States is dropping, but it is dropping most slowly in states that use the drugs the most – widening regional gaps that may be putting people in some Southeastern states at heightened risk for infections that no longer respond to antibiotics, a new analysis shows.

Researchers aren't just guessing at the danger: They also have new data showing that urinary tract infections have became more resistant to antibiotics and that the problem is worst in regions where use is highest.
...

And a new survey out today from the Pew Charitable Trusts and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows 79% of adults know they can harm their own health by taking unneeded antibiotics.

But just 47% know that doing so could harm others, including family members and people in their communities who might pick up their hard-to-treat bugs, says Allan Coukell, director of medical programs for Pew."

***

Read the full article, Southeast paying health price for high antibiotic use, on USA Today's website.

Date added:
Nov 13, 2012

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