Media Coverage

''Taking a Page, and a Pen, From Makers of Medicines''


When Sharraine Franklin, a New York City health department worker, wanted to be nice to the driver of a double-parked truck who pulled away to let her out of a parking spot, she reflexively jumped out of her car and handed him a pen.

Squinting at the health department logo on the pen, the driver laughed and shouted: “New York City! New York City don’t give nothing away!”

Free pens — bearing the names of drugs like Viagra and Januvia rather than the letters NYC — litter doctors’ offices all across New York, part of an often-criticized strategy by drug company sales representatives known as detailers, who traditionally go from waiting room to waiting room giving gifts to entice doctors to prescribe their products.

. . .

'The idea of academic detailing programs — or I assume New York City’s public health program — is that your bottom line is promoting good practices, and not necessarily return to shareholders,' said Allan Coukell, director of the Pew Prescription Project, a nonprofit effort that focuses on prescription drug policy, drug effectiveness and safety."

Full Article 

Date added:
Apr 12, 2009

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