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Mar 19, 2013

''Idaho School Lunches to Include Chef-designed Selections''

"Kids in Idaho schools may soon be dining on chef-designed school lunches. New menu items, such as fish tacos, mozzarella-crusted Pollock and Mandarin chicken rice bowl may become selections on your child’s school lunch menu in the near future, according to Melissa McGrath, spokesperson for the Idaho State Department of Education."

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Source: Teton Valley News

School Food
Mar 19, 2013

''Brominated Vegetable Oil in Gatorade?''

From oil in Gatorade to the amount of caffeine and other stimulants in energy drinks and the so-called "pink slime" found in beef, previously unnoticed ingredients are coming under scrutiny as health-conscious consumers demand more information about what they eat and drink, and sometimes go public via social networking and the Internet.

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Source: The Associated Press

Food Additives
Mar 17, 2013

2011 Pew Scholar is One of ''America's Best and Brightest Minds''

In celebration of what would have been Albert Einstein’s 134th birthday, FoxNews.com ran an article highlighting young researchers, including 2011 Pew scholar Ann Morris. Thanks to her creative research on vision in zebrafish, Dr. Morris was mentioned among scientists who are “poised to change the way we live today, and will continue to influence our culture in the coming decades.

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Source: Fox News

Biomedical Research
Mar 11, 2013

2012 Scholar Profiled in National Geographic


Dinu Florin Albeanu, a 2012 Pew Scholar, was profiled in National Geographic’s “Only Human” series, which highlighted his success as a Romanian scientist. Having lived in Bucharest for most of his life, Dr. Albeanu recognizes the challenges facing Romania’s scientific enterprise. Since relocating to the United States, the assistant professor of neurology at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has co-founded a summer program for aspiring neurologists in Romania.

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Source: National Geographic

Biomedical Research
Mar 5, 2013

''Construction That Focuses on Health of Residents''

The New York Times interviews Aaron Wernham, project director for the Health Impact Project, about the growing field of health impact assessments.

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Source: The New York Times

Health Impact Assessment
Feb 28, 2013

2011 Pew Scholar Wins Paul Allen Distinguished Investigators Award to Unlock Fundamental Questions in Biology

Jeff Gore, 2011 Pew Scholar and assistant professor of physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has won the Paul Allen Distinguished Investigators Award to Unlock Fundamental Questions in Biology. The award, announced today by the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, provides $7.5 million in exploratory grant funding to a carefully selected group of scientists who will embark on five new pioneering research projects that aim to unlock fundamental questions in biology. Dr. Gore will use single-celled yeast to explore how ideas from game theory can provide insight into cellular decision making.

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Source: The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation

Biomedical Research
Feb 27, 2013

''The Loophole That Keeps Precarious Medical Devices in Use''

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced last month that it will classify metal-on-metal hip implants as high-risk devices. That comes after the artificial joints were found to have failed at high rates, causing disability and meaning additional surgery for thousands of people. But hundreds of other potentially high-risk medical devices remain in use without what many consider to be adequate testing

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Source: The Atlantic

Drugs and Devices at the FDA
Feb 25, 2013

2001 Latin American Fellow Wins Collaborative Activity Award

Sidarta Ribeiro, a 2001 Pew Latin American Fellow, with the Brazilian Society for Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC), wins a Collaborative Activity Award: Understanding Human Cognition from the James S. McDonnell Foundation.

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Feb 25, 2013

2007 Pew Scholar Wins The Vilcek Prize

Dr. Michael "Micha" Rape, a 2007 Pew Scholar, has been named winner of The Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science for his work on ubiquitination, a process which "tags" damaged or bad proteins for destruction, as it relates to many diseases, including cancer or neurodegeneration.

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Source: vilcek.org

Feb 21, 2013

''Children in U.S. Are Eating Fewer Calories, Study Finds''

"American children consumed fewer calories in 2010 than they did a decade before, a new federal analysis shows. Health experts said the findings offered an encouraging sign that the epidemic of obesity might be easing, but cautioned that the magnitude of the decline was too small to move the needle much."

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Source: The New York Times

School Food
Feb 21, 2013

2009 Pew Scholar Identifies “Molecular Master Switch” for Pancreatic Cancer

Ben Stanger, named a Pew biomedical Scholar in 2009, co-authored a paper in Genes and Development describing a master regulator protein, which may explain the development of aberrant cell growth in the pancreas spurred by inflammation.

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Source: EurekAlert

Biomedical Research
Feb 20, 2013

Pew Scholar Reveals Role of ''Braveheart'' Molecule

Laurie Boyer, named a Pew biomedical scholar in 2008, has helped uncover the functions of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) that don’t code for proteins. In a paper published in Cell, her MIT laboratory  demonstrated how a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) they dubbed “Braveheart” stimulated the transformation of stem cells into heart cells.

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Source: MIT News

Biomedical Research
Feb 19, 2013

''USDA Wants Healthy Fare in School Vending Machines''

"The USDA proposal, authorized by the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, will require changes everywhere, said Jessica Donze Black, the director of the Kids' Safe and Healthful Foods Project at the Pew Charitable Trusts, in Washington."

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Source: Education Week

School Food
Feb 14, 2013

2011 Pew Scholar Identifies Treatment Target for MRSA

Anthony Richardson, a member of the 2011 class of Pew biomedical scholars, has pinpointed the gene that makes one strain of antibiotic-resistant bacteria more infectious than others. In a study in Cell Host & Microbe, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assistant professor proved that a single gene made one strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) impervious to a skin compound that kills off other strains. Manipulating that gene could provide a potential treatment target for all strains of MRSA.

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Source: UNC Health Care

Biomedical Research
Feb 6, 2013

2011 Pew Scholar Uncovers Clues to Cancer and the Aging Process

2011 Pew Scholar Eros Lazzarni Denchi, an assistant professor at Scripps Research Institute, has uncovered the details of a protein that help keep chromosomes from sticking together. In a paper published online ahead of print in Nature, Dr. Denchi described how the protein TRF2 actively and passively suppresses DNA repair machinery that would fuse chromosomes together. This work has significant implications for our understanding of cancer and the aging process.

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Source: Scripps Research Institute

Biomedical Research