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Aug 1, 2003

Considering the Context - Lifecycle of a Social Issue

Few people would equate grantmaking with farming, but the comparison may be apt. Farmers adapt their crop decisions to different variables of soil and climate and develop a keen sense for when their crops are ripe and should be harvested. Like a farmer, a grantmaker must consider conditions, timing and ripeness to be effective.

For a grantmaker, timing and ripeness occur not within a crop’s growth cycle, but within the lifecycle--or development stages--of a social issue. An issue goes through stages set off by events or societal shifts and is carried forward by how groups in society decide to respond. Because issues evolve in a social context that is constantly changing, a grantmaker can more clearly determine how it might address them if it has a framework to understand the lifecycle.

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Source: Trust Magazine

Apr 1, 2004

''Pew Initiative report examines regulatory review process for future ag biotech products''

A range of options exists to enhance the regulatory review process to address new challenges future products of agricultural biotechnology are likely to present, although opinions vary about the need for change, according to Issues in the Regulation of Genetically Engineered Plants and Animals, a new report released today by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology.

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Source: SeedQuest

Food Safety
May 11, 2005

''Seven Pew Biomedical Scholars are Named Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators''

"Launched in 1985, the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences provides four years of crucial support to fifteen investigators in the early to mid stages of their careers who show outstanding promise in the basic and clinical sciences. This year seven Pew Scholars, along with 36 other promising biomedical scientists, were named Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigators."

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Source: HHMI News

Biomedical Research
Oct 10, 2005

Pew Scholar Receives MacArthur “Genius” Award

Nicole King, a Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences and molecular biologist from the University of California, Berkeley, was named one of 25 MacArthur Fellows, a prestigious award by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to

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Source: Pew Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences

Biomedical Research
Oct 20, 2005

''Three young faculty members named MacArthur 'genius' fellows''

"Nicole King, a Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences and molecular biologist from the University of California, Berkeley, was named one of 25 MacArthur Fellows, a prestigious award by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to individuals whose work demonstrates exceptional originality and promise of future advances in their field."

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Source: UC Berkeley News

Biomedical Research
Nov 16, 2005

''Shoppers Uneasy About Cloning''

Two-thirds of American consumers are "uncomfortable" with animal cloning and 43 percent believe food from clones would be unsafe to eat, according to a new poll that comes as the government considers allowing products from clones into the food supply.

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Source: Washington Post

Food Safety
Jan 16, 2006

''Much Ado Over 'Lethal Genes'''

The pink bollworm is only a half-inch long, but ever since it started wriggling its way through cotton fields in 1917, it has grown into one of agriculture's most detested pests. The slimy, pink-striped blob causes more than $32 million in losses every year. So far nothing has been able to eradicate it — not insecticides, not sterilization techniques, not even biotech-enhanced cotton engineered to resist it.

The lowly fruit fly may provide a magic bullet. Scientists at the University of California in Riverside and the U.S. Agriculture Dept. have figured out how to breed bollworms that can't procreate. They do it by inserting into the pests a single piece of the fly's DNA — known as a "lethal gene" — that can be programmed to interfere with the development of the larvae, killing the next generation.

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Source: BusinessWeek

Food Safety
Sep 26, 2006

Pew Scholar Wins Lasker Prize

Carol W. Greider, a 1990 Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences, is among a trio of leading scientists who have won the 2006 Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research, one of the most prestigious awards in American science and often referred to as “the American Nobel.”

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Source: Pew Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences

Biomedical Research
Nov 1, 2006

If and When the Time Comes

A flu pandemic will affect all sectors of society. Will they be ready to deal with it? The Pandemic Preparedness Initiative helps them plan. It saves time and resources—and quite possibly its work will save lives.

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Source: Trust Magazine

Jan 30, 2008

''Studies: 'Money Better Spent Helping Family Than on Foster Care''

 Shifting more money to help families -- whose children otherwise would be taken away by social agencies -- would help save on the billions of dollars child abuse costs the country each year, a study released Tuesday shows

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Source: Daytona Beach News-Journal

Jan 30, 2008

''Group Calls for New Look at Abuse Prevention''

Child abuse and neglect cost the U.S. economy more than $104 billion in 2007, according to a new report that calls for more emphasis on prevention programs.

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Source: The Indianapolis Star

Health Topics
Feb 4, 2008

''Why Voters Play Follow-the-Leader''

 As millions of Americans gather to vote for presidential candidates in tomorrow's Democratic and Republican primaries, what they are really being asked to do is make a number of policy choices.

 

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Source: Washington Post

Feb 11, 2008

Nanotechnology's Future Depends On Who The Public Trusts''

When the public considers competing arguments about a new technology’s potential risks and benefits, people will tend to agree with the expert whose values are closest to their own, no matter what position the expert takes. The same will hold true for nanotechnology, a key study has found.

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Source: Science Daily

Feb 29, 2008

''Drugmakers asked to reveal educational grants to doctors''

"Eli Lilly & Co. thinks you deserve to know and lists its grants on its website. Pfizer plans to post similar details soon. Despite Pfizer's move, it is among the 15 companies getting a letter today from Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, asking what they're doing to 'meet the public's demand for transparency."

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Conflicts of Interest
Mar 16, 2008

''Use of Foster Care Down Across State''

 "When doctors found fractures in 23-day-old Giosyra Prendes' legs and ribs and evidence of shaken-baby syndrome, Lehigh County child welfare authorities placed her in foster care..."

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Source: The Morning Call