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The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Interactive

The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

Mar 8, 2011

President Barack Obama signed the "FDA Food Safety Modernization Act" into law on January 4, 2011. The new law is the first major update to the food safety authorities of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in over 70 years. More
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2010 Foodborne-Illness Outbreaks by Pathogen Linked to FDA-regulated Foods

Chart
  • Jan 3, 2011

Foodborne-illness outbreaks have been in the news all year. The recent recall of more than a half-billion eggs contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) – which has reportedly resulted in more than 1,600 infections nationwide in 2010, to date, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – is just the latest instance in which a common food has posed a serious public-health risk.

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Chart

Multistate Foodborne Illness Outbreaks

Data Visualization
  • Mar 13, 2014

In January 2011, President Barack Obama signed the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) into law, signaling the first major update to our nation’s food safety oversight framework since the Great Depression. Despite widespread support for the legislation and its implementation, the Obama administration still has not issued all of the proposed rules under FSMA.

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Data Visualization

Foodborne Illness Victims Go to Washington to Push for Safer Food

Image Gallery
  • Feb 3, 2014

On January 28-30, 2014, foodborne illness victims from 11 states visited Capitol Hill, asking their members of Congress to support the full funding and implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). More

Image Gallery

Oversight of a global food supply

Image Gallery
  • Jan 31, 2012

Americans' appetite for imported food has expanded dramatically over the past few decades. For each of the past seven years, food imports have grown by an average of 10 percent. Currently, between 10 and 15 percent of all food consumed by U.S. households is imported. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, nearly two-thirds of the fruits and vegetables and 80 percent of seafood consumed domestically come from outside the United States.

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Image Gallery

How Safe Are Our Food Imports?

Infographic
  • Oct 19, 2011

The Pew Health Group and the Center for Science in the Public Interest address the safety of imported seafood and raw produce.

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Infographic

A Look Into Multistate Foodborne Outbreaks

Interactive
  • Mar 19, 2014

In January 2011, President Obama signed the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) into law, signaling the first major update to our nation’s food safety framework since the Great Depression. Despite bipartisan support, and a coalition of food safety advocates and industry representatives working for its enactment, the administration still has not issued the proposed rules needed to begin implementing this law. This interactive graphic represents the most widespread multistate foodborne illness outbreaks linked to FDA-regulated products since FSMA was enacted, which constitute a small fraction of total foodborne illnesses reported during that period. More

Interactive

Is That Sandwich Safe?

Interactive
  • Feb 4, 2013

No matter how careful you are, foodborne bacteria can find a way into your child’s lunch and make him or her sick. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, stomach cramps and fever. Children are often among the most vulnerable, and in some cases, illnesses can lead to hospitalization, long-term health complications and even death.

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Interactive

Multistate Foodborne Outbreaks: A Timeline

Interactive
  • Dec 11, 2012

This interactive graphic represents the ten most widespread multistate foodborne illness outbreaks linked to FDA-regulated products since FSMA was enacted, which constitute a small portion of total foodborne illnesses reported during that period.

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Interactive

The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

Interactive
  • Mar 8, 2011

President Barack Obama signed the "FDA Food Safety Modernization Act" into law on January 4, 2011. This interactive graphic explains the key benefits from the law that consumers should expect to see in five important areas.

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Interactive

Obama needs to release draft food safety rules, say victims and advocacy groups

Issue Brief
  • Jul 17, 2012

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that one in six Americans (48 million people) suffer from a foodborne illness each year, resulting in 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths. Americans will continue to get sick and even die from foodborne disease as your Administration continues to hold up the food safety rules. In fact, the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) essentially ensured such an outcome last week in a letter to food industry representatives. In it, the FDA said that until final rules are issued, the agency would not enforce the FSMA requirements that food processors adopt prevention-based protections, and that importers assure the safety of the food products they send to the United States.

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Issue Brief

Food Products Recalled By FDA

Issue Brief
  • Jul 17, 2012

Since President Obama signed the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act into law, at least 149 FDA-regulated food products have been recalled due to potential pathogenic contamination. A recall is needed when a failure in the food safety program in a food facility results in contaminated food products being shipped to supermarkets and other retail and wholesale outlets. A recall is the last line of defense that protects consumers from getting sick.

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Issue Brief

Clostridium difficile: Rapidly Emerging Bacteria that Flourish in the Face of Antibiotics

Issue Brief
  • Mar 1, 2012

Nearly 45,000 Americans died from CDI between 1999 and 2009.

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Issue Brief

Focus On: Food Import Safety

Issue Brief
  • Oct 19, 2011

Americans’ appetite for imported food has expanded dramatically over the past few decades. For each of the past seven years, food imports have grown by an average of 10 percent. Currently, between 10 and 15 percent of all food consumed by U.S. households is imported. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), nearly two-thirds of the fruits and vegetables and 80 percent of seafood consumed domestically come from outside the United States. In this issue brief, the Pew Health Group and Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) address the safety of imported seafood and raw produce, two of the largest categories of FDA-regulated food items produced and processed abroad and then sold in the United States. More

Issue Brief

Children and Foodborne Illness

Issue Brief
  • Nov 12, 2009

Children are disproportionately affected by foodborne illness, a serious public health problem. Approximately half of the reported foodborne illnesses occur in children. Every year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that tens of millions of Americans fall ill, hundreds of thousands are hospitalized, and thousands die from foodborne illnesses.

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Issue Brief

Pew Highlights Weaknesses in Poultry Safety System

Other Resource
  • Apr 18, 2014

The Pew Charitable Trusts released a report that examines how two recent outbreaks of foodborne salmonella infections exemplify flaws in the federal food safety program. The report, “Weaknesses in FSIS’s Salmonella Regulation,” also makes seven recommendations to improve the Food Safety and Inspection Service’s control of salmonella in poultry and strengthen its response to outbreaks caused by these bacteria. More

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