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Project

Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology

Status:
Archived

Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology

Project Contact

Linda Paris Manager, Communications, Medical Programs Tel: 202-540-6354
Email:

Project Focus:

The Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology examined health and environmental issues raised by genetically modifying animals and plants, as well as the ability of the federal government to assess the risks and benefits. Its work concluded in 2007. However, the project’s research findings remain available here because they are a trusted information source on this complex topic.

The development of genetically modified foods and other agricultural biotechnology products has generated significant public debate. The potential for creating foods enhanced for health benefits or increasing crop yields was tantalizing, but there was also widespread concern about the technology’s health and environmental risks.

The Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology spotlighted policy issues arising from these discussions and served as a credible, honest broker, bringing together people with differing viewpoints to examine the opportunities and challenges of agricultural biotechnology.

Through its reports, fact sheets, polls and conferences, the project served as a respected information source on agricultural biotechnology and related policy issues for legislators, educators, the public and the media in the United States and globally. Although the project concluded its work in 2007, its resource materials remain available here.

Final Report Examines Status of Research on Functional Foods

Final Report Examines Status of Research on Functional Foods Press Release

Researchers are using biotechnology to enhance nutritional and other properties of food for consumer benefit, but such products will face a complicated array of review requirements before they can come on the market.

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FDA Recommends New Limits on Livestock Drugs

FDA Recommends New Limits on Livestock Drugs Media Coverage

To prevent development of drug-resistant bacteria that could infect people, the FDA recommended that livestock farmers use drugs solely to cure or prevent disease in animals.

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