PAST_BiotechFood_969x267v2_km_RF
Project

Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology

Status:
Archived

''FDA Recommends New Limits on Livestock Drugs''

Media Coverage

To prevent development of drug-resistant bacteria that could infect people, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended on Monday that livestock farmers use the drugs solely to cure or prevent disease in animals, phasing out their use to promote growth.

More

Final Pew Initiative Report Examines Status of Research on Functional Foods and Regulations They Will Face

Press Release
  • May 10, 2007

Researchers are using biotechnology to enhance nutritional and other properties of food for consumer benefit, but such products will face a complicated array of review requirements before they can come on the market, according to Application of Biotechnology for Functional Foods, a final new report released today by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology.

More

Conference Proceedings on Emerging Challenges for Biotech Specialty Crops, Now Available from the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology, APHIS

Press Release
  • Mar 27, 2007

Biotech specialty crops—fruits and vegetables, tree nuts and nursery crops—face unique regulatory challenges, but there are opportunities to improve the regulatory system to help support this important sector of the U.S. agricultural economy, according to participants at a recent workshop, co-sponsored by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).

More

New Report on Moral and Ethical Issues Related to GE Food Animals From the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology, Michigan State University

Press Release
  • Mar 7, 2007

Many public discussions about cloned and genetically engineered (GE) food animals have focused on questions of the regulatory authorities that may govern such animals, but few have considered the impacts of ethical or moral concerns. While ethical issues can be equally as or even more important than safety and regulatory issues to many people, there is currently no established venue where these issues can be fully addressed, according to some of the experts who gathered at a workshop last October sponsored by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology and Michigan State University.

More

New Conference Proceedings Examine Genetically Engineered Food and Feed Imports, Implications For U.S. Domestic Policies

Press Release
  • Feb 8, 2007

In September 2006, the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology held a workshop in Washington, D.C., examining issues related to the potential importation into the U.S. of new varieties of genetically engineered (GE) crops and the various implications this could have on the U.S. regulatory system and food industry.

More

Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology to Conclude Its Work

Press Release
  • Jan 25, 2007

The Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology will conclude its work at the end of March 2007. Established by The Pew Charitable Trusts in 2001, the project has achieved its goals of illuminating policy issues arising from advances in ag biotech and serving as a credible “honest broker” that could bring together stakeholders of differing views to discuss the opportunities and challenges that ag biotech presents.

More

''Much Ado Over 'Lethal Genes'''

Media Coverage

The pink bollworm is only a half-inch long, but ever since it started wriggling its way through cotton fields in 1917, it has grown into one of agriculture's most detested pests. The slimy, pink-striped blob causes more than $32 million in losses every year. So far nothing has been able to eradicate it — not insecticides, not sterilization techniques, not even biotech-enhanced cotton engineered to resist it.

The lowly fruit fly may provide a magic bullet. Scientists at the University of California in Riverside and the U.S. Agriculture Dept. have figured out how to breed bollworms that can't procreate. They do it by inserting into the pests a single piece of the fly's DNA — known as a "lethal gene" — that can be programmed to interfere with the development of the larvae, killing the next generation.

More

Updated Issue Brief on U.S.-EU Trade Dispute over Genetically Modified Crops Released by Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology

Press Release
  • Dec 16, 2005

In light of a decision expected soon by the World Trade Organization (WTO) on the U.S. challenge to the European Union (EU) policy on genetically modified (GM) foods, the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology has updated its brief on the trade dispute between the U.S. and the EU over agricultural biotechnology.

More

Workshop Proceedings on Regulatory and Commercialization Issues Related to Genetically Engineered Animals

Press Release
  • Dec 6, 2005

In March and May 2005, the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology hosted workshops to explore issues related to the regulation and commercialization of the products of animal biotechnology. Participants included animal biotechnology researchers from academia and industry; other representatives from the biotechnology, food, and agriculture industries; consumer, environmental, and animal welfare advocates; ethicists; and federal agency officials.

More

''Shoppers Uneasy About Cloning''

Media Coverage

Two-thirds of American consumers are "uncomfortable" with animal cloning and 43 percent believe food from clones would be unsafe to eat, according to a new poll that comes as the government considers allowing products from clones into the food supply.

More

Americans’ Knowledge of Genetically Modified Foods Remains Low; Majority Are Skeptical About Animal Cloning

Press Release
  • Nov 15, 2005

Americans’ knowledge of genetically modified (GM) foods and animals continues to remain low, and their opinions reflect that they are particularly uncomfortable with animal cloning, according to a new survey released today by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology.

More

Policy Dialogue Explores Genetically Modified Imports, Implications For Domestic Policies

Press Release
  • Nov 11, 2005

The potential importation of genetically modified (GM) food and commodities from other countries raises a number of issues for U.S. regulators, farmers, food processors and distributors, such as how the regulatory system will handle these products and whether the food and commodity system is prepared.

More

Workshop Proceedings on Moral and Ethical Aspects of Genetically Engineered and Cloned Animals

Press Release
  • Oct 28, 2005

In January 2005, the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology hosted a workshop to explore moral and ethical aspects of genetically engineering and cloning animals. Participants and attendees included animal biotechnology researchers from academia and industry, representatives from the biotechnology and food and agriculture industries, consumer and animal welfare advocates, ethicists and federal and state regulatory officials.

More

''Pew Initiative report examines regulatory review process for future ag biotech products''

Media Coverage

A range of options exists to enhance the regulatory review process to address new challenges future products of agricultural biotechnology are likely to present, although opinions vary about the need for change, according to Issues in the Regulation of Genetically Engineered Plants and Animals, a new report released today by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology.

More