Interactive

Is That Sandwich Safe?
What You Need to Know Before Packing Your Child’s Lunch


No matter how careful you are, foodborne bacteria can find a way into your child’s lunch and make him or her sick. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, stomach cramps and fever. Children are often among the most vulnerable, and in some cases, illnesses can lead to hospitalization, long-term health complications and even death.

Using safe food-handling practices, such as keeping food refrigerated, cooking it to proper temperature and washing hands and utensils while preparing food at home can help minimize the growth and spread of contamination. However, safe handling alone doesn’t always eliminate bacteria that may already exist in food when it comes from the field or processing facility.

That’s why a prevention-based food safety system outlined in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act is key to effectively reducing risks. But it needs to be fully implemented to work.

Check out the interactive sandwich below to learn more about which dangerous bacteria can pose a threat, and urge the White House to finalize the new regulations as soon as possible, so we can ensure a safer food supply – and sandwich – for all Americans. 

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Date added:
Feb 4, 2013

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