Featured Reports

Out of Balance: A Look at Snack Foods in Secondary Schools across the States

Out of Balance: A Look at Snack Foods in Secondary Schools across the States

The majority of our nation’s secondary schools do not sell fruits and vegetables in school stores, snack bars, or vending machines, according to a new report by the Kids’ Safe and Healthful Foods Project. Read More

Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs: An Assessment of the Evidence for Best Practices

Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs: An Assessment of the Evidence for Best Practices

A PDMP is a statewide electronic database that gathers information from pharmacies on dispensed prescriptions for controlled substances. This white paper describes what is known about PDMP best practices and documents the extent to which these practices have been implemented. Read More

Legal Review Concerning the Use of Health Impact Assessments in Non-Health Sectors

Legal Review Concerning the Use of Health Impact Assessments in Non-Health Sectors

This report examines the legal foundations that support incorporating health considerations into policy and programmatic decisions made in non-health fields. The findings are intended to aid public health professionals and others who seek to ensure that such decisions are made with health in mind. Read More

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Dec 4, 2004

Tending The Fields

Not surprisingly, most states with large agricultural sectors are intensely interested in the economic promise of agricultural biotechnology. Many are eager to capture the economic development and growth potential of a new technology that could provide added value to low-priced commodity crops

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Food Safety

Mar 1, 2005

The Automatic 401(k): A Simple Way to Strengthen Retirement Savings

Over the past quarter century, private pension plans in the United States have trended toward a do-it-yourself approach, in which covered workers bear more investment risk and make more of their own decisions about their retirement savings. Some workers have thrived under this more individualized approach, amassing sizable balances in 401(k)s and similar plans, which will assure them a comfortable and relatively secure retirement income.

For others, however, the 401(k) revolution has fallen short of its potential. Work, family, and other more immediate demands often distract workers from the need to save and invest for the future. A disarmingly simple concept—what we call the automatic 401(k)”—has thepotential to cut through this Gordian knot and improve retirement security for millions of workers through a set of common sense reforms.

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Retirement Security

Apr 23, 2007

The Book 'Aging Gracefully: Ideas to Improve Retirement Security in America' (Spring 2007 Trust Magazine briefing)

A proposes legislative and administrative changes that would make saving for retirement easier for middle- and lower-income households, while at the same time offering practical savings ideas for workers. Aging Gracefully: Ideas to Improve Retirement Security in America was published by the Century Foundation Press and written by William G. Gale, J. Mark Iwry and Peter R. Orszag, Brookings Institution scholars who are principals of the Pew-supported Retirement Security Project, a partnership of Brookings and Georgetown University’s Public Policy Institute.

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Retirement Security

Jan 30, 2009

The Genetic Town Hall

The Genetics and Public Policy Center’s Public Consultation Project on Genes, Environment, and Health consisted of focus groups, interviews with community leaders, a survey, and a series of town halls. This report summarizes the five town hall sessions, which took place from March-May 2008 in Jackson, Mississippi; Kansas City, Missouri; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Phoenix, Arizona; and Portland, Oregon.

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Genetics

Nov 21, 2006

The Potential Effects of Retirement Security Project Proposals on Private and National Saving

This paper from The Retirement Security Project provides rough, ballpark calculations of how several recent proposals could affect private and national saving. The proposals, aimed at improving retirement security for middle- and low-income households, include automatic 401(k)s, automatic IRAs, an expanded and permanent Saver's Credit, split refund capability, and asset test reforms. With the current net national saving rate at about 2.5 percent of GDP, these proposals have the potential to raise net national saving by almost a quarter.

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Retirement Security

Mar 1, 2005

The Savers' Credit: Expanding Retirement Savings for Middle- and Lower-Income Americans

The Saver’s Credit is the first and so far only major federal legislation directly targeted at promoting taxqualified retirement savings for middle- and lower-income workers. Although this is an important step, several options are available to improve the design, not the least of which is the credit’s scheduled expiration at the end of 2006.The first section of the paper provides background on the evolution and design of the Saver’s Credit. The second section discusses the rationale behind the Saver’s Credit and the role of such a credit in the retirement income security system as a whole. The third section examines empirical data and models of the revenue and distributional effects of the Saver’s Credit. The fourth section discusses measures that would expand the scope and improve the efficacy of the Saver’s Credit.

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Retirement Security

Sep 20, 2005

The Student Debt Dilemma

When student loans are the only way to pay for college, who decides how much debt a degree is worth? This paper explores how debt aversion and conflicting views about the role of student loans affect young people, their families, and those who advise them.

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Health Topics

Sep 12, 2007

Time For Change

Academic medical centers (AMCs) form the intellectual core of medicine, training future doctors and researchers, and establishing standards that guide practicing physicians in the wider community. Where pharmaceutical industry marketing conflicts with the goals of patient care and professionalism, AMCs can provide leadership and guidance by establishing new standards on physician-industry relationships.

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Conflicts of Interest

Sep 30, 2008

Time for Reform

Many significant improvements have been made to the foster care system over the years, and across the country, case workers and court officials have worked to facilitate better outcomes for children in the government’s care. Yet the number of foster youth aging out of care keeps rising. In 2006, the latest year for which data are available, 26,181 youth aged out of care, a 119 percent increase since 1998. On average, youth who aged out of foster care in 2006 spent five years in the system, compared with less than two years for children who left through reunification, adoption, guardianship or other means.

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Health Topics

Dec 12, 2007

Time for Reform: Hoping for a Home for the Holidays

Each year, more than 500,000 children spend the holidays in foster care. In some cases the holidays may be spent with extended family, but more often it is spent with foster families to whom children are not related, or in group homes or institutional settings. Although foster care is an important safety net for children who have suffered abuse or neglect, being in foster care is not always easy.

 

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Health Topics

Jan 29, 2008

Time for Reform: Investing In Prevention

Approximately 3.6 million children were reported to child protection authorities as possible victims of abuse and neglect in 2005. Unfortunately, few data exist about services provided to these children, but it is estimated only 2.5 percent of these children receive any kind of preventive services. We do know that, of the 899,000 confirmed cases of maltreatment, our child welfare system provides services or supports to approximately 60 percent of the children.

 

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Health Topics

Mar 1, 2007

Time for Reform: Too Many Birthdays in Foster Care

This report provides an introduction to the foster care system and describes what life is like for the more than 500,000 children in foster care who are waiting for reforms that would help them return to their families or find new permanent families. Foster care provides a temporary place for children and youth to stay when they are removed from their families because of abuse or neglect. But what was intended as a temporary solution has become a long-term state of uncertainty for many children. More

Apr 2, 2013

Too Slow

A multistate outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg infections linked to ground turkey in 2011 sickened 136 people, causing 37 hospitalizations and one death. The Pew Charitable Trusts' analysis of the outbreak found numerous inadequacies in the foodborne illness surveillance system that, if addressed, could help to prevent illnesses and, in some cases, deaths.

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Food Hazards

Jul 22, 2010

Two Steps Forward

This report presents findings of the Pew Health Group’s most recent assessment of the credit card marketplace, based on data collected in March 2010.

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Credit Cards

Apr 24, 2007

U.S. Public Opinion on Uses of Genetic Information and Genetic Discrimination

While Americans are generally very supportive of the use of genetic information to improve their own health and the health of their families, 92 percent are wary that this same information could be used in ways that harm them, according to a public opinion survey by the Genetics and Public Policy Center conducted in late February and early March of 2007.

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Genetics

Jul 20, 2010

Unbanked By Choice

This study compares banked and unbanked families across several categories including financial behavior, economic status and perceptions of the financial service industry.  

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Alternative Financial Services, Banking, Lending

Jan 1, 2006

Using Tax Refunds to Increase Savings and Retirement Security

Allowing households to split their refunds could make saving simpler and, thus, more likely. Since federal income tax refunds total nearly $230 billion a year (more than twice the estimated annual aggregate amount of net personal saving in the United States), even a modest increase in the proportion of refunds saved every year could bring about a significant increase in savings.

This policy brief explores the important potential of refund splitting to expand savings and discusses the obstacles and practical steps needed to make the splitting of tax refunds a reality.

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Retirement Security

Dec 19, 2013

Weaknesses in FSIS's Salmonella Regulation

The Pew Charitable Trusts analyzed the events surrounding two multistate outbreaks of salmonella infections. It identified significant weaknesses in existing federal regulations and policies aimed at controlling salmonella contamination in poultry products. More

Food Safety